Senators Collins, Mikulski Introduce Bipartisan Resolution Commemorating 100th Anniversary of Girl Scout Gold Award Recognizing Excellence and Leadership for Girls

Gold Award is highest honor bestowed by the Girl Scouts of America - Senators are co-leaders of Honorary Troop Capitol Hill, a Girl Scout Troop of the women of the Senate

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Senators Susan Collins (R-ME) and Barbara Mikulski (D-MD) announced that they have introduced a bipartisan resolution to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Girl Scouts’ Gold Award, the highest award the organization bestows which recognizes excellence and leadership for girls.

“As a former Girl Scout in my home town of Caribou, I have such fond memories of earning badges, and I remember how wonderful it was to learn new skills,” said Senator Collins.  “The character, volunteerism, and leadership skills that Girl Scouts build contribute greatly to our society. Girl Scouts taught me that determination, principles, and respect for others can take you everywhere you want to go—including to the halls of the United States Capitol.  I’m delighted to honor 100 years of the Girl Scout’s Gold Award and remember the tremendous history of this fine organization as it celebrates the beginning of its second century of education and empowering young women.”

“I love the Girl Scouts and I love being a Girl Scout. For more than a century, the Girl Scouts have stood for the education and empowerment of girls,” Senator Mikulski said. “The Girl Scouts teach character, honesty, integrity and competency in a movement that has changed America and the world. I’m so pleased to mark 100 years of the Girl Scout’s Gold Award that for generations has been honoring excellence and leadership for girls.”

Senators Collins and Mikulski have worked on behalf of the Girl Scouts, supporting programs such as Girl Scouts Beyond Bars which allows girls to visit mothers who are incarcerated and participate in mother-daughter troop meetings. They are co-leaders of Honorary Troop Capitol Hill, a Girl Scout Troop of the women of the Senate.

“We are thrilled that Congress is recognizing the centennial of the Girl Scout Gold Award, and so honored to have the support of our wonderful leaders and members from Troop Capitol Hill,” said Anna Maria Chavez, CEO of Girl Scouts of the USA. “The Gold Award is the ultimate symbol of the fact that today’s girls are tomorrow’s female leaders. For 100 years, from Washington to Wall Street and beyond, the young women who have earned their Gold Award have helped move our communities forward, and by extension, changed our world forever and for better.  They have become the female leaders that inspire the next generation of girls to go for gold as Girl Scouts, and we extend our warmest thanks to Troop Capitol Hill, and female and male leaders from both sides of the aisle for their continued support of our Movement, and their recognition of the courage, confidence and character it takes to earn the highest honor in Girl Scouts – the Girl Scout Gold Award.”

In addition to Senators Collins and Mikulski, the bipartisan resolution is cosponsored by Senators Patty Murray (D-WA), Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV) and Tammy Baldwin (D-WI).

 

The text of the bipartisan resolution is below:

Title: Recognizing the Girl Scouts of the United States of America on the 100\th\ Anniversary of the Girl Scout Gold Award, the highest award in the Girl Scouts, which has stood for excellence and leadership for girls everywhere since 1916.

Whereas each girl who pursues the Girl Scout Gold Award aspires to transform an original idea and vision for change into an actionable plan with far reaching and sustainable results;

Whereas for more than a century preceding the date of adoption of this resolution, the Girl Scouts of the United States of America (referred to in this preamble as the “Girl Scouts”) has inspired girls to lead with courage, confidence, and character;

Whereas the Girl Scout Gold Award represents the highest form of the ideals of courage, confidence, and character;

Whereas the Girl Scout Gold Award calls on a Girl Scout in grades 9 through 12 to take on a project that has a measurable and sustainable impact on the community of the Girl Scout by—

(1) assessing a need;

(2) designing a solution to the need;

(3) completing the project; and

(4) inspiring others to sustain the project;

Whereas the highest award in Girl Scouting honors leadership in the tradition of the Girl Scouts;

Whereas the Girl Scout movement began on March 12, 1912, when Juliette “Daisy” Gordon Low, a native of Savannah, Georgia, organized a group of 18 girls and provided the group of girls with an opportunity to develop physically, intellectually, socially, and spiritually;

Whereas the goals of Juliette “Daisy” Gordon Low were to bring girls of all backgrounds together to develop self-reliance and resourcefulness, and to prepare each girl for a future role as a professional woman and active citizen outside the home;

Whereas shortly after the inception of the Girl Scout movement, it was decided that there should be a special recognition for each girl who—

(1) represents the very best of the Girl Scouts; and

(2) through courage, tenacity, dedication, and skill, takes action in her community with an immediate and sustainable impact;

Whereas, in 1916, the Golden Eaglet was introduced as the highest award in Girl Scouting;

Whereas the highest award in Girl Scouting has been known as the Golden Eaglet, the Curved Bar Award, First Class, and, for the period of 35 years preceding the date of adoption of this resolution, the Girl Scout Gold Award;

Whereas although the name of the highest award in Girl Scouting has changed over the years, the conviction, dynamism, and idealism it takes to earn the award have not;

Whereas the Girl Scout Gold Award, like each girl who earns the award and the project the girl undertakes—

(1) stands as an enduring symbol of the fortitude and personal strength of a Girl Scout; and

(2) clearly demonstrates the tangible, real-world impact that participation in the Girl Scouts can have on the life of a girl, and by extension, the community of the girl and the world;

Whereas earning the Girl Scout Gold Award is comparable to achieving the rank of Eagle Scout in the Boy Scouts of America;

Whereas a girl who earns the Girl Scout Gold Award—

(1) joins an elite group of less than 6 percent of Girl Scouts each year; and

(2) may be eligible for a higher grade when enlisting in the Armed Forces of the United States or for scholarships at certain institutions of higher education;

Whereas according to a study of the Girl Scout Research Institute entitled “The Power of the Girl Scout Gold Award: Excellence in Leadership and Life”, recipients of the Girl Scout Gold Award, compared to nonrecipient peers—

(1) report a more positive sense of self;

(2) are more engaged civically and in community service;

(3) have more confidence in their leadership abilities; and

(4) experience greater life satisfaction and success;

Whereas the Girl Scout Gold Award acknowledges the power and dedication of each young woman to better herself and to make the world a better place for other individuals;

Whereas during the century preceding the date of adoption of this resolution, millions of Girl Scout alumnae have positively impacted their communities and the world with creative, effective, and sustainable Take Action projects; and

Whereas in the centennial of the Girl Scout Gold Award, the Girl Scouts invites alumnae and supporters of the Girl Scouts everywhere to “Celebrate 100 Years of Changing the World”: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved, That the Senate—

(1) recognizes the remarkable impact that recipients of the Girl Scout Gold Award during the century preceding the date of adoption of this resolution have had on—

(A) the lives of individuals in the United States; and

(B) the world;

(2) recognizes the lasting impact of the projects of recipients of the Girl Scout Gold Award on the communities of the recipients;

(3) congratulates the Girl Scouts of the United States of America and Girl Scout Gold Award recipients everywhere on the centennial of the Girl Scout Gold Award; and

            (4) joins the Girl Scouts of the United States of America in celebrating 100 years of the Girl Scout Gold Award.