Senators Collins, McCaskill Lead Aging Committee Hearing: Finding a Cure: Assessing Progress Toward the Goal of Ending Alzheimer’s by 2025

Hearing examined the human and economic toll of Alzheimer’s, researchers’ accomplishments, the critical role and needs of caregivers, and future steps needed to combat this disease

Click HERE for a copy of Senator Collins’ opening statement

Click HERE for a copy of Senator McCaskill’s opening statement

Washington, D.C.—U.S. Senator Susan Collins, the Chairman of the Senate Aging Committee and Co-Chair of the Congressional Task Force on Alzheimer’s Disease, and Senator Claire McCaskill, the Ranking Member of the Senate Aging Committee, held a hearing today on the importance of Alzheimer’s research and the need to support family caregivers.  The hearing, titled, “Finding a Cure: Assessing Progress Toward the Goal of Ending Alzheimer’s by 2025,” examined the progress made in combating Alzheimer’s disease since the enactment of the National Alzheimer’s Project Act (NAPA) in 2011 and assessed the next steps needed to achieve the ultimate objective of finding a means to treat, cure, and—ultimately—prevent Alzheimer’s. 

“Alzheimer’s is a devastating disease that exacts a tremendous personal and economic toll on individuals, families, and our health care system,” said Senator Collins.  “While we have made significant progress in increasing funding for Alzheimer’s research, we must continue to support the research community, which is making important strides through clinical trials with new therapeutic targets.  Moreover, we must support the family caregivers, who make many personal and financial sacrifices to ensure that their loved ones have the care they need.  Together, we can achieve a world where Alzheimer’s can be treated, cured, or prevented.”

“We must continue to provide resources and support to help those with Alzheimer’s disease and those who care for them—however if we don’t also invest more in medical research this disease will bankrupt not only our government but also our families,” said Senator McCaskill.

The Aging Committee’s hearing highlighted the tremendous personal and economic toll Alzheimer’s disease has on the individual, the family, and our society.  In addition to the human suffering it causes, Alzheimer’s costs the United States an estimated $236 billion a year, including $160 billion in costs to Medicare and Medicaid.  These costs will skyrocket as the baby boom generation ages. 

 

Witnesses for the hearing included:

·Dr. Ronald Petersen, Chair of NAPA’s Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care, and Services.  Click HERE for a copy of Dr. Petersen’s written testimony.

·David Hyde Pierce, Award-winning actor, advocate, and former member of NAPA’s Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care, and Services.  Click HERE for a copy of Mr. Hyde Pierce’s testimony.

·Polly Bradley, Director of Adult Day Services, Southern Maine Agency on Aging.  Click HERE for a copy of Ms. Bradley’s testimony.

·Lisa Baron, Executive Director, Memory Care Home Solutions.  Click HERE for a copy of Ms. Baron’s testimony.