Collins, Feinstein: Makeup Containing Asbestos Shows Why FDA Needs Recall Authority

Senators’ bill gives FDA recall authority, improves safety of personal care products

Washington, D.C.U.S. Senators Susan Collins (R-ME) and Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) released the following statement after makeup sold at Claire’s, a retail chain popular with children and teenagers, was found to contain asbestos:

 

“Recent news that makeup containing asbestos was sold by Claire’s and Beauty Plus highlights why we must pass the Personal Care Products Safety Act. The FDA still lacks the authority to recall personal care products that threaten public health, and our bill fixes that.

 

“What’s particularly striking about these reports is that the FDA asked Claire’s to voluntarily recall some of its products in March, and the company refused. Asbestos is a known carcinogen and shouldn’t be in any products that go on our skin, particularly makeup marketed to young teenagers and children. These products should have been removed from the shelves immediately.

 

“In addition to providing FDA with recall authority, our bill would improve the safety of personal care products by requiring the FDA to review ingredients, requiring companies to report adverse health events and providing stronger labeling standards. 

 

“It’s been more than 80 years since consumer safety laws for personal care products were last updated. From makeup to shampoo, these are products that men, women and children put on their skin daily, and we have right to know whether they’re safe.”

 

Earlier this year, Senators Collins and Feinstein introduced the Personal Care Products Safety Act, which would:

 

  • Require the FDA to evaluate a minimum of five ingredients found in personal care products per year to determine their safety and appropriate use;

 

  • Provide FDA the authority to recall personal care products that threaten consumer safety;

 

  • Provide FDA the authority to require labeling of products that include ingredients not appropriate for children and those that should be professionally administered;

 

  • Require complete label information to be posted online, including ingredients and product warnings;

 

  • Require companies to provide contact information on their products for consumers and report serious adverse events to FDA. Health effects that could have resulted in hospitalization without early intervention would also be required to be reported;

 

  • Require manufacturers to register annually with FDA and provide the agency with information on the ingredients used in their personal care products; and,

 

  • Direct FDA to issue regulations on Good Manufacturing Practices for personal care products.